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Topic Summary

Posted by: Kish
« on: May 26, 2004, 12:34:59 AM »

Okay. :)
Posted by: Joe
« on: May 25, 2004, 11:55:12 PM »

I'd prefer the term "Abrahamic religions". :)
Posted by: Kish
« on: May 25, 2004, 11:20:43 PM »

Feel free to imagine I wrote, "We're not talking Islam here," if it's that important to you.
Posted by: Joe
« on: May 25, 2004, 11:03:10 PM »

I don't know if there are any Realms deities who forbid sex outside of marriage--we're not talking Christianity here.

At the risk of being incredibly picky and annoying, Christianity is not the only religion that discourages premarital sex.

Posted by: rreinier
« on: May 20, 2004, 05:39:31 AM »

Not really. Gods would respond to Virtue rather than Reputation, since they see all that the party does, and why they do it.

The gods of Faerun are not omniscient.
But they will still know quite a bit more about the party than most people, won't they?
Posted by: Mongoose87
« on: May 19, 2004, 07:46:21 PM »

Yes, the gods of Faerun are somewhat less perfect than most gods owrships on earth.  They kind of remind of the greek gods
Posted by: CORVIS TERRIBLE MOUNTAIN GOD
« on: May 19, 2004, 04:27:44 PM »

Not really. Gods would respond to Virtue rather than Reputation, since they see all that the party does, and why they do it.

The gods of Faerun are not omniscient.
Posted by: rreinier
« on: May 19, 2004, 04:08:36 PM »

Perhaps, but expectations are about Reputation, not Virtue.
Not really. Gods would respond to Virtue rather than Reputation, since they see all that the party does, and why they do it.

It's not more virtuous to hurt someone if you're already a creep, and it's not less virtuous to save someone if you're good. Even with reputation, an evil person's bad act may be the "last straw", while a good person's evil act is more likely to be forgiven as one mistake.
But that evil act by the good person will have a larger impact on his reputation anyway, since his record is no longer spotless. I may be as heroic as I want, but if I cut down a peasant in the middle of Athkatla, people won't really like me as much as they would have if I hadn't. On the other hand, if people dispise me anyway, one murder won't change matters much. They always expected me to be capable of it, so me actually doing it will result in a far lesser reputation drop.

The same logic would apply to Virtue, I would think...
Posted by: neriana
« on: May 19, 2004, 02:22:29 PM »

It's not more virtuous to hurt someone if you're already a creep, and it's not less virtuous to save someone if you're good. Even with reputation, an evil person's bad act may be the "last straw", while a good person's evil act is more likely to be forgiven as one mistake.
Posted by: Kish
« on: May 19, 2004, 01:19:47 PM »

Perhaps, but expectations are about Reputation, not Virtue.
Posted by: rreinier
« on: May 19, 2004, 01:05:46 PM »

Of course. High achievements set high expectations.
Posted by: SimDing0
« on: May 19, 2004, 11:00:56 AM »

Quitch proposed that Virtue should be relative, so if your Virtue is high, you receive a greater penalty for evil actions. Perhaps, therefore, cheating should only cause a drop if you have very high Virtue?

Although this introduces a problem, because it means that the more good deeds a Paladin does, the easier it is for them to fall.
Posted by: Kish
« on: May 10, 2004, 08:31:28 PM »

Admitting you cheated may actually hurt the person you cheated on more than hiding it from them. So how can you judge, in this situation, what is morally right for someone else?
Again, there's really no question of admitting it or hiding it--none of your dialogue options attempt to deny that you slept with Phaere, if you did.
Quote
And how can you think that cheating on someone is morally equivalent to, say, leaving Jaheira to die?
I don't think anyone would argue that.
Posted by: neriana
« on: May 10, 2004, 07:09:34 PM »

Admitting you cheated may actually hurt the person you cheated on more than hiding it from them. So how can you judge, in this situation, what is morally right for someone else? And how can you think that cheating on someone is morally equivalent to, say, leaving Jaheira to die?
Posted by: jester
« on: May 10, 2004, 05:45:41 PM »

The second I must confess. The fundamental idea behind anything like virtue is that it affects everyone. True, it is only recorded and handled for the PC, but if the PC happens to be a paladin the next best example would be Keldorn I think. The discussion topic was grief caused by betrayal and the resulting drop because of an evil act.

The second part of my post hints at the differences between plain adultery and a very special situation during an undercover mission. I hope this cleared things up a bit.

The combat may be irrelevant, but your antagonists are not. The yardstick for evil must clearly be 'evil' and not bad or really annoying. As Quitch said then there should be a 1/5 drop for cheating on your partner and not admitting it. Actually admitting it could undo that drop, because apologizing and sincere regret should be rewarded too.

I say you shouldn't make it impact Virtue. :)